Tuesday, 22 November 2016

Slow Wired Charging And Limited Battery Life - The iPhone's Oft Ignored Weak Points



I currently use three phones on a daily basis: a Lumia 950, Galaxy S6 and iPhone 6. Two of these phones have excellent battery life, wireless charging and wired fast charging. The third manages to be a perfect flop, with limited battery endurance and relatively slow charging, despite its smaller battery size.

The biggest sin for me though is the absence of wireless charging. The technology just seems like a no-brainer for Apple. This is the company that pushed Wifi into the mainstream with the original iBook and Airport. Wireless charging seems just as desirable and useful to the end user. So why no love from Apple?

Wired fast charging is brilliant too. In a low battery situation it's possible to get sufficient charge into either the Galaxy or Lumia to last out the rest of the day in as little as ten minutes.

The thing is that I rarely get to a point where I have to make use of the facility. I have wireless chargers dotted around my home and office - by my bedside, on my desks, even in my car's centre console armrest. Whenever I put my phone down its charging. Which means that I'm almost always at, or close to full charge. No matter how hard I'm using the phone. And wireless chargers are cheap. The standard Samsung unit has been on sale for around £6 at Amazon recently, so you don't even have to resort to unknown brands.

So between these two technologies smartphone range anxiety has been completely banished.

Except for my iPhone. Yes, I could plug it in when using it in my car and yes I could plug it in at my desk or bedside. And don't get me wrong, I do so as often as I can. It's just that the conscious action of tethering the phone to a charger is much more limiting than dropping onto a charging base and being able to pick it up and wander off without a second thought.

For all that the iPhone is a premium phone Apple's failure to adopt either of these options means it lags behind some rather more ordinary phones.

Or as The Guardian's review of the iPhone 7 headlined: 'how good can a phone be if the battery doesn't last even a day?

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