If The Pixel Is Nearly As Good As An iPhone, Why Not Just Get An iPhone?


The Google Pixel offers a very specific take on what Android should be, Google's take in fact. And it turns out that Google's take on an Android phone is an iPhone. Almost.

That seems like a problem to me. Why go for an imitation, albeit a very good one, when you can have the original?

The problem is that Google had taken all of the reasons why you might choose to pass on the iPhone and drop them into the Pixel.

So if you were hoping for display out through the Pixel's USB-C port you'll be disappointed. Support for wireless display standards like Miracast is missing too. No expansion and no replaceable battery, unsurprising given their absence on the Nexus line. Google has failed to deliver water ingress protection or Optical Image Stabilisation, two things even Apple added this year.

Google has also managed to rip off the iPhone 6 design without managing to make a more attractive device. And whilst the iPhone has a whole army of third party accessory developers and companies producing clever add-ons and software experiences, the Pixel is starting from scratch.

The Pixel's camera may be close to the performance of the iPhone 7, although without OIS it's been underperforming in low light tests, but it doesn't seem to be a better experience or produce significantly better photos. The XL misses out on the iPhone 7 Plus's dual camera setup too, an 'innovation' that shouldn't be underestimated in the consumer market.

Ironic, then, that it was HTC (OEM for the Pixel) who first experimented with dual camera arrays on smartphones..

To me the Pixel seems to serve the same market as the Nexus - an Android phone with good upgrades. For everybody else it takes all of the perceived failures of the iPhone, adds them to all the inherent weaknesses of Android and then wraps them up in an offering that takes Google deeper than ever before into your personal information.

Does that sound like a winning proposition to you?

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