Consumer Retrenchment A Microsoft Strategy

elitex3

Microsoft’s hopes for mobile depend on a future paradigm shift, one that the company claims to be working on today. The information, shared in an interview with Le Point magazine by new Microsoft France chairman VahĂ© Torossian, explains that Microsoft now believes that the entry price to market share in the consumer market is too high and as a result it will focus on the business market.

Good luck with that!

BYOD, user choice and the perceived benefit of getting a iPhone or premium Android phone will do for that strategy. Enterprise may be historically Microsoft-centric, but if every person in the decision chain is lusting after an iPhone or a Galaxy S7, just how likely is it that phones like the HP Elite x3 will get any look in?

The suggestion of many sites reporting this news today is that Continuum is the leap forward that Microsoft is planning on making. Don’t get me wrong, I like Continuum, but the chances of the average consumer buying into the concept are slim to none. As it is the solution is only viable in enterprise if the business has invested heavily in app virtualisation technology or has migrated all of its enterprise applications to the browser in HTML5.

Realistically this isn’t going to happen. Ever. Indeed the presence of iOS (or to a lesser extent Android) apps in the commercial marketplace is going to have a wider and wider effect on core Windows sales, not just Mobile. Why lumber a user with a laptop when they’d be infinitely happier toting an iPad and all of your software runs there anyway?

Microsoft currently has a healthy server and enterprise application business that will keep driving profits, but ultimately all of its properties are now under serious assault. Microsoft can only keep its house of cards standing if all of its legs are in place.

The removal of Windows on smartphones may seem like a limited loss, but its failure is just one of the things that potentially destabilise the whole business.

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