Windows 10 Recommended Upgrade: Dirty Trick Or Helping Users

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When Microsoft does something right it rarely makes the headlines. When it gets things wrong it always does. No wonder the company has such a poor reputation amongst the general populace. That said, knowing this to be the case you’d think the powers that be within Microsoft would do more to prevent some of the PR own goals that from the outside look completely avoidable.

Case in point, the Windows 10 upgrade for owners of Windows 7 and 8.x machines. Users who haven’t already upgraded have grown used to seeing the prompt telling them that an upgrade is available and we’ve all seen the videos of that pop-up disrupting news broadcasts and game streaming sessions.

Until now it was easy enough to be rid of the update by simply dismissing the pop-up, however in the last week Microsoft changed the behaviour of the dialog box so that dismissing the pop-up accepted the upgrade.

Unsurprisingly there has been uproar.

The fact that the most popular story on the BBC today was the story of this change and the way that it tricks users into upgrading to Windows 10 when they don’t want to be upgraded.

The dialogue box itself does present an option to prevent the upgrade, it just doesn’t make itself very obvious.

Microsoft’s response to the fuss is that the imminent cessation of its free Windows 10 upgrade offer means that many customers risk missing out. Sounds reasonable until you realise how much effort Microsoft has put into making sure that every user of an older version of Windows knows that there’s a free upgrade available.

If someone hasn’t upgraded to Windows 10 by now, chances are they just don’t want it. By being underhand (or giving the appearance of being underhand, which is just as bad) Microsoft is doing itself no good at all.

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