Does The Badge On The Device Determine Your Purchasing Decision?

Do you have a go-to brand that is your default choice when buying a new device? It's a relatively common phenomenon. People with iPhones are more likely to own iPads and eventually to migrate to a Mac. Galaxy phone owners are more likely to have Samsung tablets and Sony owners a whole host of Sony equipment.
 
When it comes time to replace our devices loyalty is pretty high too. Recent surveys have shown that around 80% of buyers will stick with the brand they already have.
 
As buying cycles get longer though and each purchase ties you into a longer relationship, buyers may be doing themselves a disservice by failing to look at alternative options when buying - even if only to validate the suitability of the device selected.
 
For me that was driven home by my decision to replace my laptop. As I've posted before, Apple's range offered nothing new over my existing MacBook Air. My other default purchase has been from Microsoft, having bought both Surface Pro and Surface 3 models previously. As a result the Surface Book looked like an easy choice.
 
Except that much as I liked the Surface Book design, objectively it gave me some concerns. For a device with a likely usable life of five or more years the unproven fulcrum hinge design and screen release mechanism didn't fill me full of confidence. Great screen, great looks and flexibility all score well, but a risky choice, even setting aside the reliability problems that have dogged the Surface Book since launch.
 
So having gone into the purchasing process expecting to go with another Apple or Microsoft device I'd ruled both out before even really getting going. Once I started looking further afield it became clear that better devices existed than anything either offered, and I needed to set aside my brand preferences to get the right one for me.
 
It's something worth bearing in mind when you're next in the market.

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