Was Apple Right About Fixed Storage After All

 
Removable storage and the ability to quickly and cheaply expand the capacity of Android phones has been on of the mainstays of the argument against the iPhone ever since it launched. There's a good reason. The prices Apple charges for its larger memory configurations are way out of line with customer's perceptions of what that extra storage is worth.
 
Of course Apple makes that 'storage tax' harder to avoid by shipping its devices with base storage capacity that is borderline unusable.
 
However, I'm finding that with the right level of storage from the start neither Android nor Windows Phone needs to offer the memory expansion. Currently the three phones that I own are the Nokia Lumia 930, Samsung Galaxy S6 and iPhone 6.
 
None have storage expansion. None have caused me any problems with running out of space.
 
Samsung's decision to make 32Gb its base configuration on the S6 has rendered the conversation around the removal of storage expansion moot. Google doesn't offer memory expansion on its Nexus line, citing concerns around the performance of devices which have to accommodate large and/or slow memory cards. It needs to follow Samsung's lead and make 32Gb its base storage level. I'm sure if Apple were to do the same the whole issue would be forgotten.
 
It's unlikely to happen though, as the base iPhone is built to hit a price point and Apple is unlikely to sacrifice its margins (or the pressure on consumers to pick a higher spec device).
 
Incidentally when I say none of these phones have expandable storage, technically that's an untruth. The GS6 offers USB OTG, which allows mass storage devices to be connected and used as part of the file system.
 
 

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