What Could Nokia Achieve In The Smartphone Space?

 
Having divested itself of its badly flawed mobile phone division, in a way that cost it billions, not to mention saddling Microsoft with a huge problem in the process, Nokia is being touted for another run at the smartphone market. This probably won't please Microsoft, however the constraints put on the Finnish company when the sale of its handset division was completed, were of limited duration.
 
As a result Nokia is coming back in a new leaner form.
 
Nokia's phone handsets were always characterised by great hardware and woeful software. The power of the Symbian division within the company was so great it was able to sabotage the development of something more suitable to battle against the iPhone. That sort of tribalism, paired with development teams that apparently never looked at competitors product did for the Finns.
 
In the three years following the iPhone's release Nokia went from making mediocre handsets with garbage software to making mediocre handsets with garbage software and an unintuitive touch interface.
 
The new Nokia will do things rather differently. Handsets will be built by partners using Android operating systems and running specialist Nokia software. By using the right OEMs Nokia will be able to churn out handsets that compete at all levels of the market, whilst trading on its good name (especially useful in developing nations).
 
The question for me is how long does it take Nokia's news phone division to outsell its old one? I have a suspicion that might not be something we have to wait long for...

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