The Chromebook Pixel - Small Sales, Big Impact

Chromebooks are either a resounding success or a desperate failure, depending on who you listen too and what metrics you believe.

Some who have tried them have dismissed them as pointless and too reliant upon an available Internet connection. Others who have spent longer amounts of time rave a out them.

Samsung's and Acer's previous Chromebooks have played in the entry level laptop space - selling well (according to Amazon's figures anyway) by offering a laptop for less than the price of a laptop. The disadvantages of Chrome OS offset by the financial advantage.

So what are we to make of the Chromebook Pixel now that its been with us for a little while?

The Pixel has been torn apart for being ridiculously expensive, over species and packing all the disadvantages of the regular Chromebook.

That's completely missing the point.



Go to any Internet cafe, business meeting, developer conference and you'll see nothing but MacBooks. High end laptops that look great and cost a chunk more than your average machine.

People don't want to be seen to be using a low end machine where their reputation matters. This has been a problem for Chrome OS fans in the past. Pack your low spec machine and look bad in the eyes of your peers, or go with the MacBook instead.

The Pixel solves this dilemma. It's high end hardware is a match for anything that Apple has on the market, it's a curiosity which enhances your standing with your peers and it still runs the Chrome OS you love.

Google doesn't need to sell many. But every one it does sell erodes some of the apathy towards Chromebooks across the board.

A win all round.

And not at all an expensive machine in this context.

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